Category: News

ALUMINATURE at Swanson Contemporary

Excited to announce my upcoming solo exhibition, ALUMINATURE at Swanson Contemporary from September 27TH – October 28TH 2017!   #savethedate   #ALUMINATURE  #onehelluvayear

CELEBRATE WITH ME AT THE OPENING RECEPTION — FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 29TH, 2017,  from 6 – 9 PM

ALUMINATURE references not only to the variety of aluminum surfaces to which images are presented onto but also to the phenomena of the natural world in my subject matter. The exhibition features work from several recent series in addition to new works inspired by my experience as the 2017 Regional Artist in Residence at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest. 

Swanson Contemporary will also be open during the First Friday Trolley Hop on October 6th from 6 – 9 PM.  The gallery is located in the heart of the NULU Arts District at 636 East Market in Louisville, Kentucky.  Hours of operation are Wednesday through Saturday from 12 – 6 pm.

ALUMINATURE is a featured exhibition in the 2017 Louisville Photo Biennial, a regional festival occurring in over 60 venues throughout Louisville, Lexington and Southern Indiana from September 22nd through November 11th.

ALTERED PERCEPTIONS – An LVA Louisville Photo Biennial Exhibit at Metro Hall

This is an undeniably big year for me!  It’s as if all the things I have been cultivating in my life of late is coming to fruition at once.  It’s a biennial year for the Louisville Photo Biennial and I have quite the presence in it this year!  Not only am I still teaching with the Biennial, I am also part of several exhibitions…this being one of them.  And let’s face it, this isn’t just any exhibition…it’s an exhibition at Mayor Greg Fishers gallery in Metro Hall!!   You can see this show until January 19th, 2018.

Bull and Friends by C.J. Pressma

What an incredible honor to be selected by Keith Waits of LVA to be part of their Louisville Photo Biennial show at Metro Hall.   The show is entitled “Altered Perceptions” and I am a one of three featured artists who use a photographic image as a means to an end.   I, along with C.J. Pressma and Mitch Eckert illustrate ways in which photography can be employed outside of the traditional realms of 2-d presentation.

Photographer C.J. Pressma is well known amongst the visual art scenes in Louisville and far beyond.  He is the founder of the Center for Photographic Studies in Louisville that originated in the 1970’s and has inspired many with his lifelong dedication to the photographic medium…in all it’s forms!  In “Altered Perceptions”, Pressma exhibits his beautiful photographic quilts, and was the foundation that this exhibition was built around.

Lilly Lemon Peaches Cherries by Mitch Eckert.

Artist and University of Louisville Associate Professor of Art, Mitch Eckert also approaches the use of the photographic image in different ways.  In his ‘Translations’ series, he staged still life compositions inspired by Dutch masters still life paintings.  Initially unhappy with the work, he crumpled up the images and tossed in the trash.  But he wasn’t quite done with them and upon retrieving from the trash, he smoothed out the surface to reveal a beautiful crumpled texture he resinated with and decided to reshot the work…and we are all glad he did!  .

And then if you know anything about me, you know that I am a photographer whose heart lies beyond the click of the shutter.  For years, my goal has been to keep a hands-on approach in processing digital imagery.  In this show, I feature not only some of my recent work incorporating digital image transfers onto wood and metal substrates but also exhibit some of my photo encaustics from the Tiny World Series.

Weaving Reed, from my Tiny World Series

Go see this exhibit!  Mitch Eckert‘s work is located on the second floor, CJ Pressma‘s is located in the third floor stairwell and my work is featured on the fourth floor by the elevators.

Metro Hall is located at 527 West Jefferson St in downtown Louisville.  Hours of operation are Monday – Friday from 8:30AM to 4:30PM.

The exhibit will be up until January 19th, 2018.

Bernheim Regional Artist In Residence

Lots of long deep breaths taken in front of this tree.

 

So thrilled to announce that I have been awarded the first Regional Artist in Residence at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest in Clermont, Kentucky.  This prestigious and highly competitive Artist in Residence program has been established for over 30 years and have hosted the likes of national and international artists Ray MetzkerLynn Geesaman, Shinji Turner-Yamamoto, Julia OldhamNicholas Dowgwillo, Firat ErdimJaime Bull, Tomasz Domanski, Carlotta BrunettiHideki Kanno,and Madison Cawein to name just a few.  This is an incredible honor and the recognition of my work means so much to me.  It also validates the decisions I made a few years back in being less career focused and more passion driven, encouraging me to stay on this path.

 

Art as seen on Lake Nevin!

 

(Click HERE to see the read more about the 2017 Artists in Residence at Bernheim)

 

Upon sharing my news, I have gotten a lot of “What exactly does that mean?” kind of questions.  Generally, an Artist in Residence means that you take actual residence at a place somewhere away from your usual environment and obligations.  Most often there is a fairly extensive application to submit and only a handful of artists get selected.  The granted experience provides time for reflection, finding inspiration and production of (usually) an already proposed project.  Some residencies cost money to stay there, others are free…some offer stipends, but most do not.

 

Dogwoods…a week ago when they were crazy in bloom!

 

Bernheim is providing me a stipend and temporary living quarters in exchange for a work of art to be left to the Bernheim Foundation.  This particular residency is also unique in that I have access to all horticulture and operations departments, as well as ecologists, scientists, naturalists and forest managers.  I am also allowed admittance to most scheduled hikes and eco classes offered throughout the calendar year.   I have literally been invited to become part of the entire ecosystem at this amazing place and I love how this program enhances the visitor experience through arts interaction.   This is an experience/opportunity I will not be taking lightly!

 

Little baby pine cones in the making.

 

I am encouraged to use this residency to further investigate, experiment, and explore new avenues in my work.  My project proposal for the Artist-in-Residence program is to create a large scale, multi paneled, photographic installation for a currently undetermined space in the arboretum.  The imagery will be captured during extensive exploration of the Bernheim grounds while in residency.

I currently explore the hands-on process of integrating photographic images with surfaces like wood, glass, and aluminum.  I find that the substrate is just as important as the image itself and the incorporation of the two has the power to transcend the traditional boundaries of the photographic medium.  I am enamored with aluminum as a substrate and have explored it thoroughly in the forms of both foil and plate.  It’s shiny, reflective surface is ever changing as you move around it and the material harkens back to the vintage Tintypes of the past.

 

 

But instead of simply transferring an image onto plain aluminum, I intend to “cook” my aluminum plates to distress and age them.  Cooking can be done in a handful of ways with simple gear that ranges from a dish washer to a turkey roaster as well as homemade designs using readily available materials.  The agents for change are cleaning products such as Cascade and TSP.  The objects I intend to use for distressing and creating unique, unduplicated patterns onto the aluminum plates are natural materials such as fallen trees, debris and plant material collected while exploring the grounds of Bernheim.  Essentially I am “developing” these plates with the natural legacy of this beautiful place that I will then transfer photographic images onto.   Working in this fashion lets chance intuitively dictate my work while asking the image to surrender to the process.

For more information about this process and my prior results, check out this blog post from a few months ago.

 

Early in the residency and days long past…magnolia blossoms for days!

 

I have been staying in their artist cabin for most of April, and will be returning methodically through out the year.  When I can, I’ll also be making work in the Lake Nevin Studio.  If you make a trip…and I highly recommend you do…let me know…it’s likely I could be there too!

This story has only just begun my friends!

~jz

(See the full list of former Artists-in-Residence and learn more about the Arts in Nature Program at Bernheim.)